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Thursday, 12 July 2012

Silver War Badge: Private Theodore Kenneth McLachlan, 58 Battalion, AIF

ID Number    PERS017

Title               Silver War Badge: Private Theodore Kenneth McLachlan, 58 Battalion, AIF

Maker            Unknown

Object Type   Badge

Place made     Unknown

Date made      c 1918

Physical          Silver
Description

Description
Silver War Badge with impressed serial number 'A21207' on reverse. The badge is circular with the words 'FOR KING AND EMPIRE SERVICES RENDERED' around the rim, and a voided cypher and crown of King George V in the centre. The reverse has a hinged horizontal pin clasp. These badges were issued to men who could no longer serve and were discharged because age, wounds or sickness had rendered them permanently unfit for further service.

Summary
Theodore Kenneth McLachlan was a 30 year old drover from Echuca, with 4 ½ years part-time service in the Victoria Rangers (time expired 1909), when he enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) on 20 June 1916. 2773 Private McLachlan embarked for overseas from Melbourne, Victoria, on board Transport A71 Nestor on 2 October 1916 with the 6 Reinforcement of 58 Battalion.  

He disembarked at Plymouth, England on 16 November 1916, and began training with 15 Training Battalion soon after. Private McLachlan proceeded overseas to France on 30 December and began a further period of training with 5 Division Base Depot, Etaples.

Private McLachlan was taken on strength of 58 Battalion in the field from 5 DBD on 7 February 1917. He was wounded in action on 26 March with a gun shot wound to the abdominal wall and fractured ribs. The seriously wounded McLachlan was evacuated to 3 Australian Casualty Clearing Station on 28 March. This was followed by transportation to England and admission to Brooke War Hospital, Woolwich on 19 April. McLachlan was transferred to 3 Auxiliary Hospital, Woolwich on 20 July 1917.

On 7 Aug McLachlan was discharged from 3 Aux Hospital and allowed to go on 2 week furlough. At the completion of his leave, he was ordered to Weymouth on 21 Aug. He left England to return to Australia on 18 Oct and arrived in Melbourne on 10 December 1917.

2773 Private McLachlan was discharged as medically unfit on 8 Mar 1918. His GRI Silver War Badge was issued on 23 July 1918.

Theodore’s two brothers also served:

347 James Osrich Neil McLachlan, 13 Light Horse Regiment, enlisted on 28 Dec 1914, returned to Australia on 27 Apr 1919.

2195 Norman Hector McLachlan, 13 Light Horse Regiment, enlisted on 15 Oct 1915, returned to Australia on 15 Jan 1919.


Wednesday, 27 June 2012

Volunteered For Active Service Badge, Medically Unfit: Edward Stanley Dusting

ID Number    PERS016

Title               Volunteered For Active Service Badge, Medically Unfit: Edward Stanley Dusting

Maker            Unknown


Object Type    Badge

Place made     Australia

Date made      1916

Physical          Silver plated brass
Description

Description
Circular, silver plated Volunteered For Active Service Badge - Medically Unfit. Around the outside of the badge in raised lettering is 'VOLUNTEERED FOR ACTIVE SERVICE'. In the center of the badge is the Australian coat of arms surrounded by 'ISSUED BY DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE MEDICALLY UNFIT' in raised lettering. On the reverse of the badge are two silver plated lugs. Beneath the lug is impressed the badge number '53093'.

Summary
The Volunteered For Active Service, Medically Unfit badge was issued to people of military age who had volunteered for active service outside Australia since 1 July 1915, but had been certified by an authorised Medical Officer as medically unfit to do so.

Badge 53093 was issued on 30 June 1916 to Edward Stanley Dusting of 240 Graham Street Port Melbourne. During the course of the First World War 38 men joined the AIF from Graham Street. Edward Dusting had volunteered to serve also, though he was rejected as being medically unfit, and this badge must have been very welcome when it was issued, as it would show the families of those that were serving that he had attempted to ‘do his bit’.

Sunday, 20 May 2012

Stretcher Bearer's Brassard


ID Number    PERS015

Title               Stretcher Bearer's Brassard

Maker            Hicks, Atkinson & Sons Pty Ltd

Object Type  
Badge

Place made     Australia: Victoria, Melbourne

Date made      1916

Physical          Brass; linen; wool; felt; white metal
Description

Description
White woollen herringbone brassard (arm band), lined with white linen, with a white metal buckle, and five brass eyelets at the free end for size adjustment. The letters ‘SB’ denoting stretcher bearer are sewn in fine red felted wool cloth to the centre. The rear bears manufactures stamp in purple ink ‘HICKS, ATKINSON & SONS PTY LTD 1916’ and a black stamped military inspector's arrow and the two letter code ‘WS’.

Summary
These brassards were worn on the left upper sleeve by stretcher bearers to identify their function and to allow them not to be confused with stragglers moving rearwards from the frontline. 


A Stretcher Bearer's with brassard seen in 1918.

Friday, 11 May 2012

Sergeant Morrish Paul Tonkin MM, 7 Light Horse Regiment, AIF

 
ID Number    PERS014.01

Title               Soldier’s Continuation Pay Book: Sergeant Morrish Paul Tonkin, 7 Light Horse Regiment, AIF

Maker            Unknown

Object Type  
Personal Equipment

Place made     Unknown

Date made      c 1915-1916

Physical          Cardboard; linen; paper
Description

Description
Army Book 64, Soldier's (Continuation) Pay Book for use on Active Service, with red brown glazed linen cover and 16 pages. Period covers 28 September 1916 - 30 April 1917. Owner's details printed on page 3: ‘Regiment or Corps, 7th Light Horse; Squadron, Battery, or Company, B; No., 334; Name in full, Tonkin, Morrish Paul; Date of Attestation, 30/9/14; Age on Enlistment, 19 11/12.

Summary
Morrish Paul Tonkin was a 20 year old farmer from Cronulla, New South Wales when he enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) on 30 September 1914. 334 Trooper Tonkin embarked for overseas on board HMAT A33 Ayrshire on 20 December 1914 with B Squadron 7 Light Horse Regiment.  He disembarked in Egypt on 1 February 1915.

Initially light horse units, being mounted, were considered unsuitable for operations on Gallipoli. However, after the landing and infantry casualties mounted, it was decided dismount the light horse and deploy them to reinforce the tenuous ANZAC position. The 7 Light Horse Regiment was sent to Gallipoli in late May and became responsible for a position on the extreme right of the ANZAC line.

On 8 August, Trooper Tonkin was evacuated from Gallipoli due to illness and sent to Egypt. He rejoined his regiment in Gallipoli on 2 October. The 7 Light Horse was in a defensive role until it left the peninsula on 20 December 1915. Trooper Tonkin arrived at Alexandria, Egypt on Christmas Day 1915.

In Egypt, the 7 Light Horse Regiment became part of the ANZAC Mounted Division and, in April 1916, joined the forces defending the Suez Canal from a Turkish advance across the Sinai Desert. It fought at the battle of Romani on 4 August, at Katia the following day, and was involved in the advance that followed the Turkish retreat back across the desert. On 14 August Trooper Tonkin was promoted to Corporal.

The regiment spent late 1916 and early 1917 engaged on patrol work until the British advance into Palestine stalled before the Turkish bastion of Gaza. It was then involved in the two abortive battles to capture Gaza directly on 27 March and 19 April respectively. On 2 June 1917, Tonkin attended on a 2 week Hotchkiss Machine Gun Course. On 31 October, the 7 Light Horse participated in the wide outflanking move via Beersheba that ultimately led to the fall of Gaza.

When Gaza fell on 7 November 1917, the Turkish positions in southern Palestine collapsed. The 7 Light Horse Regiment was involved in the pursuit that followed and led to the capture of Jerusalem in December. The focus of British operations then moved to the Jordan Valley. In 1918 the 7 Light Horse Regiment was involved in the raids on Amman between 24 and 27 February and Es Salt on 30 April to 4 May. Corporal Tonkin was promoted to Sergeant on 17 June. On 14 July the regiment also helped defeat a joint Turkish-German attack launched on the Jordan bridgehead around Musallabeh. 

The next major British offensive was launched along the coast in September 1918, and the 7 Light Horse Regiment took part in a subsidiary effort east of the Jordan. It was part of the force that captured Amman on 25 September. The next day Sergeant Tonkin was awarded the Military Medal (research is currently being undertaken to obtain a copy of the MM citation). The capture of Amman proved to be the 7 Light Horse’s last major engagement of the war as Turkey surrendered on 30 October 1918.

On 15 November 1918, Sergeant Tonkin MM embarked for Australia on 1914 leave. He arrived in Australia on 26 December and discharged on 24 February 1919 earning the total sum of 600 Pounds for his war service.

Morrish Tonkin again served his country, during the Second World War from 9 Sep 1941 to 1 Nov 1945.

Also see PERS014.02, 03, and 04.


 ID Number    PERS014.02

Title               Soldier’s pay book: Sergeant Morrish Paul Tonkin, 7 Light Horse Regiment, AIF
Maker            Unknown

Object Type  
Personal Equipment

Place made     Unknown

Date made      c 1916 -1917

Physical          Paper; missing cardboard and linen cover
Description

Description
Soldier's pay book, serial number 236790. It is missing its dark brown glazed linen cover and has 19 pages. Period covers 1 May 1917 - 24 February 1919. Owner's pay details printed on front cover: ‘Pay-Book No. 236790; Surname, TONKIN; Christian Names, Morrish Paul; Regimental No., 344; Religion, C of E; Rank, Tpr (crossed out and replaced with Sgt); Date of Attestation, 30/9/14; Age on Enlistment, 19 11/12; Unit, 7 ALH Regt.


ID Number    PERS014.03

Title               Pay Book Cover: Sergeant Morrish Paul Tonkin, 7 Light Horse Regiment, AIF

Maker            Unknown

Object Type  
Personal Equipment

Place made     Unknown

Date made      c 1916 -1917

Physical          Cardboard; impregnated linen
Description

Description

A dark brown impregnated linen cover designed to hold the Soldier’s Pay Book and to protect it from moisture. On the cover is hand written “No. 334 M P Tonkin 7th ALH Regt”.


ID Number    PERS014.03

Title               Transport Ship’s Berthing Card: Sergeant Morrish Paul Tonkin, 7 Light Horse Regiment, AIF

Maker            Unknown

Object Type  
Personal Equipment

Place made     Unknown

Date made      c 1918

Physical          Cardboard
Description

Description
A printed cardboard berthing card for the SS Port Darwin issued to 334 Sergeant Morrish Paul Tonkin MM, 7 Light Horse Regiment, when he returned to Australia in November 1918. It shows his berthing location, boat station and mess hall location.


Sergeant Morrish Paul Tonkin MM 7 Light Horse Regiment wearing his Military Medal circa 1920.


Morrish Paul Tonkin on his mount circa 1917-1918. Both photographs courtesy of Morrish's son Mr. Graham H. Tonkin.

Tuesday, 10 April 2012

Pattern 1903 - 90 Round Bandolier: B Squadron, 12 Light Horse Regiment, AIF



ID Number    EQUI001

Title               Pattern 1903 - 90 Round Bandolier: B Squadron
                      12  Light Horse Regiment, AIF

Maker           Holden & Frost

Object Type  
Field Equipment

Place made     Australia, South Australia, Adelaide

Date made      1915

Physical          Leather, brass, copper and steel
Description

Description
Nine pocket, brown leather ammunition bandolier. The leather band supporting the ammunition pouches is cut in a curve and is in two pieces joined by three steel rivets. Each side has a cut out strip in the centre where the pouches are attached top and bottom by steel and copper rivets. There are five pouches on the front side and 4 on the rear. Each pouch carries 2 charging clips of 5 rounds each for a total capacity of 90 rounds. Each pouch has a flap fastened by a brass stud. Inside each pouch is a leather divider so that only one charger may be removed at a time. The pouches of this particular bandolier have been modified by cutting a slit in the pocket body to act as a further means of securing the pocket flaps. The length of the bandolier can be adjusted by brass buckles at either end. The bandolier is stamped with manufacturer ‘Holden & Frost 1915’, unit ‘12 ALH, B SQUADRON, 53’ and also with the initials ‘RBW’.

Summary
This particular bandolier was used by a member of B Squadron of the 12 Light Horse Regiment. When it was found it had been stored since the period 1918/19. It had pieces 1918 dated newspaper folded and stored in the pockets to make sure that they would keep their shape.

The following information on the 12 ALH is from the AWM website:

The 12th Light Horse Regiment was raised, as part of the 4th Light Horse Brigade, at Liverpool, New South Wales, on 1 March 1915. It sailed from Australia in two contingents in June 1915. The first contingent put in at Aden on 12 July to reinforce the British garrison there against a predicted enemy attack; they only left their ship for a single route march, and sailed again on 18 July without having seen action.

The regiment was reunited in Egypt on 23 July 1915 and began training as infantry, having been ordered to leave its horses in Australia. A month later it deployed to Gallipoli. The regiment was again split up, to reinforce three light horse regiments already ashore - A Squadron went to the 1st Light Horse Regiment, B Squadron to the 7th, and C Squadron to the 6th. It was not reunited until 22 February 1916, by which time all of the AIF troops from Gallipoli had returned to Egypt.

Returning to its mounted role, the 12th Light Horse joined the forces defending the Suez Canal on 14 May 1916. In ensuing months it conducted patrols and participated in several forays out into the Sinai Desert. In April 1917 the regiment moved into Palestine to join the main British and dominion advance. It joined its first major battle on 19 April when it attacked, dismounted, as part of the ill-fated second battle of Gaza.

With two frontal attacks on Gaza having failed, the next attempt to capture the Turkish bastion was a wide outflanking move via the town of Beersheba, launched on 31 October 1917. A deteriorating tactical situation late on the first day of the operation caused the 12th and its sister regiment, the 4th, to be unleashed on Beersheba at the gallop - an action which has gone down in history as the charge of Beersheba.

After Gaza fell on 7 November 1917, Turkish resistance in southern Palestine collapsed. The 12th Light Horse participated in the pursuit that followed, and then spent the first months of 1918 resting and training. It moved into the Jordan Valley in time to participate in the Es Salt raid between 29 April and 4 May. The regiment subsequently manned defences on the west bank of the Jordan.

In August, the regiment was issued with swords and trained in traditional cavalry tactics in preparation for the next offensive against the Turks. This was launched along the Palestine coast on 19 September 1918 - its objective, Damascus. The mounted forces penetrated deep into the Turkish rear areas severing roads, railways and communications links. The 12th Light Horse was one of the first Australian units to enter Damascus on 2 October 1918. The regiment was soon involved in the next stage of the advance and was on its way to Homs when the Turks surrendered on 30 October. While awaiting to embark for home, the 12th Light Horse were called back to operational duty to quell the Egyptian revolt that erupted in March 1919; order was restored in little over a month. The regiment sailed for home on 20 July 1919.
































 

Thursday, 5 April 2012

Other Ranks' Service Dress Jacket

ID Number    UNI001

Title               Other Ranks' Service Dress Jacket

Maker            Reed & Bush


Object Type   Uniform

Place made     Australia

Date made      1916

Physical          Cotton; Oxidised brass; Brass; Leather; Wool
Description

Description
An other rank's unlined khaki wool service dress jacket with a stand and fall collar, pleated breast pockets with pointed flaps, and large expanding pockets on each hip, also with pointed flaps. The front of the jacket, pockets, cuffs and shoulder straps and collar are fastened with pressed leather buttons – these having replaced the original vegetable composition buttons. A fabric false belt is sewn to the waist and the free end fastens with a brass slide buckle. A box pleat runs from back yoke down the length of the jacket for expansion and ease of wear. The back of jacket is also loosely pleated into the waistband while the front is shaped by four vertical darts running behind the pockets. The collar bears oxidised brass 'Rising Sun' general service badges, and the shoulder straps have straight oxidised brass 'AUSTRALIA' titles. There is rank insignia for sergeant on the upper right sleeve (being made from a corporal to which has been added a single stripe) and four blue woven service chevrons sewn to the lower right sleeve (these are in fact upside down with the point down as opposed to up), indicating 4 years overseas service beginning in 1915. Above the left hand chest pocket is two small incisions to which a ribbon bar for the Military Medal has been added. A printed cotton manufacturer's label sewn to the inside back yoke reads, 'REED & BUSH SIZE 20 1916. The jacket has been altered by a tailor to give a better fit by the partial removal of the collar and creating two large darts that run diagonally from the front of the collar to the outer corner of each breast pocket, and then replacing the collar. The sleeve length has been reduced by removing the cuff and shortening the sleeve and reattaching the cuff.  A hook and eye have been sewn to the edges of the collar to allow it to be fastened together, thereby creating a smart look that was much in fashion with some individuals. The chest pockets have had glove snaps sewn to their insides to prevent the corners from turning up. There is evidence of unit colour patches having been removed in the past.




Friday, 30 March 2012

Sam Browne Belt: Lieutenant Frank Fourro, 35 Battalion AIF

ID Number    PERS013

Title               Sam Browne Belt: Lieutenant Frank Fourro, 35 Battalion AIF

Maker            M. Harve and CompanyLimited

Object Type  
Personal Equipment

Place made     England, Walsall

Date made      1916

Physical          Leather and brass
Description

Description
A brown leather Sam Browne belt with brass fittings and single shoulder strap. The belt is fitted with a double clawed brass buckle, and has a brass stud and sliding leather loop to locate the free end of the belt tongue.  A flat brass hook is located on the left hand side. There are 4 reinforced brass 'D' rings attached to the top edge of the belt, enabling 2 shoulder straps to be worn. A further pair of 'D' rings is located on the lower edge of the belt, at the left hand hip either side of the brass hook. The shoulder strap, which passes from the left hand front (over the right shoulder) to the left hand rear loop, is attached at front and rear by a brass stud and eyelet, and adjusted by a brass buckle. Marked inside the belt in ink is ‘F Fourro’ and stamped is ‘Lieut F Fourro AIF’.

Summary
Frank Fourro was a 29 year old married brickmaker from Auburn, New South Wales with 3 years service in the Australian Rifle Regiment and 15 months service in the Canadian Militia Artillery when he enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) on 17 August 1914. 124 Private Fourro embarked for overseas on board HMAT A14 Euripides on 19 October 1914 with A Company of the 3 Battalion.

Private Fourro landed on Gallipoli with the 3 Battalion on 25 April 1915. He was wounded in action on 27 April and was subsequently evacuated. He was promoted to Corporal on 17 May and rejoined his unit on Gallipoli on 28 August. On 23 September Corporal Fourro was evacuated from Gallipoli once again, this time being admitted to 3 Australia General Hospital at Mudros on the Island of Lemnos Island, with Dysentery. He returned to the Gallipoli and was subsequently promoted to Sergeant on 1 December 1915. Fourro arrived in Alexandria, Egypt from the evacuation of Gallipoli on 29 December 1915.

On 12 March 1916 Sergeant Fourro was transferred to the 1 Machine Gun Company and along with that he unit embarked at Alexandria on 22 March and arrived Marseilles, France on 28 March. On 27 July 1916 he was wounded in action for the second time with a gun shot wound to the right heel and was sent to the 4 Field Ambulance. He was subsequently sent to the 23 General Hospital Etaples, 20 August and embarked for England and arrived at the Beaufort War Hospital the next day.

Upon discharge from hospital, Sergeant Fourro was subsequently transferred to the 34 Battalion on 21 October 1916. He embarked for France on 21 November 1916 and attended a Bombing course from 22 to 29 January 1917. On 10 February 1917 Fourro was promoted to Second Lieutenant. He transferred to the 35 Battalion on 17 February. On 2 June 1917 Second Lieutenant Fourro was wounded in action for the third time with a Gun Shot Wound to the right leg which was listed as severe. He was sent to the 9 Field Ambulance, the 2 Australian Casualty Clearing Station, the 4 General Hospital and the 3 London General Hospital.

On 25 June 1917 Fourro was promoted to Lieutenant. He was discharged from 3 London General Hospital on 26 July and was posted to the 9 Training Battalion on 7 August. On 21 October 1917 he marched in to 10 Training Battalion, Fovent. Between 10 and 22 September 1917 Lieutenant Fourro undertook a bombing instructor’s course, at Lyndhurst.

On 4 February 1918 Fourro was admitted sick to Fovent Hospital. On 22 April he transferred to London General Hospital and on 3 May he was transferred to 5 Australian Auxiliary Hospital, Wandsworth. Lieutenant Fourro returned to Australia due to Anaemia Debility/Anaemic Heart 12 May 1918. 
  


Photo of Lieutenant Frank Fourro circa 1918 wearing the exact same Sam Browne belt seen above. Courtesy of the Australian National Archives.

Wednesday, 14 March 2012

Soldier’s Pay Book: Gunner Arthur Jones, Z5A Medium Trench Mortar Battery, AIF

ID Number    PERS012.02

Title                Soldier's Pay Book: Gunner Arthur Jones, Z5A Medium Trench Mortar  
Battery, AIF

Maker             Unknown

Object Type  
Personal Equipment

Place made     Unknown

Date made      c 1916-1917

Physical          Paper; missing cardboard and linen cover
Description

Description
Soldier's pay book, serial number 79806. It is missing its dark brown glazed linen cover and has 19 pages. Period covers 1 March 1917 - 10 September 1918. Owner's pay details printed on front cover: ‘Pay-Book No. 79806; Surname, Jones; Christian Names, Arthur; Regimental No., 2673; Unit, Z.5.A Medium Trench Mortar Battery; Transferred to, 10th A.M.T.M BTY.’
See PERS012.01 (below) for summary

Soldier’s Pay Book: Gunner Arthur Jones, Z5A Medium Trench Mortar Battery, AIF

ID Number    PERS012.01

Title                Soldier’s Pay Book: Gunner Arthur Jones, Z5A Medium Trench Mortar Battery, AIF

Maker             Albert J. Mullett, Government Printer, Melbourne

Object Type  
Personal Equipment

Place made     Australia, Victoria, Melbourne

Date made      1915

Physical          Cardboard; linen; paper
Description

Description
Army Book 64, Soldier's Pay Book for use on Active Service, with brown glazed linen cover and 16 pages. Period covers 27 October 1915 - 22 February 1917. Owner's details printed on page 3: ‘Regiment or Corps, 23 Batt; Squadron, Battery, or Company, 6 Rfts (this has subsequently been crossed and 58th and later Z5A T.M. B’ty has been added); No., 2673; Rank, Pte (crossed out and replaced with Gunner); Name in full, Jones Arthur; Date of Attestation, 2/8/15; Age on Enlistment, 27 7/12.

Summary
Arthur Jones was a 27 year old wheeler from Wonthaggi, Victoria when he enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) on 2 August 1915. 2673 Private Jones embarked for overseas on board HMAT A38 Ulysses on 27 October 1915 with the 6 Reinforcement of the 23 Battalion.  He disembarked at Alexandria Egypt on 24 November 1915. Jones was admitted to the 3 Australian General Hospital from 18 to 28 January 1916. He was transferred to the 58 Battalion on 23 February. On 5 March 1916 he transferred to the 59 Battalion and was sent to Ferry Post and the Suez Canal Defences. Jones embarked at Alexandria on 18 June and disembarked on 29 June at Marseilles, France.

On 5 July 1916 Private Jones transferred to the Z5A Trench Mortar Battery and his rank became Gunner. After almost a year of operations, including participation in such battles as Poziers and Ypres, he was granted leave to the United Kingdom, lasting from 28 April to 13 May 1917.  From 9 August to 5 September 1917 Gunner Jones attended a course of instruction at the 5 Army Trench Mortar School. He was admitted to hospital sick with knee injury from 17 September to 17 October 1917.

Gunner Jones transferred to the 10 Australian Trench Mortar Battery on 28 January 1918. He was granted a second leave to the United Kingdom, lasting from 9 to 26 February 1918. Jones was admitted to hospital sick with scabies from 10 April to 10 May 1918. He was wounded in action, gun shot wound to his hand, near Mont St Quentin on 19 August 1918 and was sent to the 9 Field Ambulance, then to the 55 Casualty Clearing Station and subsequently to the 6 Australian General Hospital, Rouen. On 21 September 1918 Jones was evacuated to the United Kingdom and admitted to Portsmouth Military Hospital. He marched into the Overseas Training Brigade, Hurdcott, on 30 November 1918.

Gunner Jones left the UK on 8 January 1919 and arrived in Melbourne Australia 27 February. He was discharged on 21 April 1919.

Also see PERS012.02.

Thursday, 8 March 2012

Identity Discs: Lance Corporal Leslie Thomas McIntyre, 59 and 60 Battalions, AIF

PERS011.1 Obverse

PERS011.1 Reverse

PERS011.2 Obverse

PERS011.2 Reverse

PERS011.3

Center: L/Cpl  L. T. McIntyre. From a group photo of 59 Battalion NCOs taken 23 November 1918. On his left is 3171 Sgt P. Little DCM MM. Picture from Give Me Back My Dear Old Cobbers, by Robin S. Corfield, Corfield and Company, Victoria 2008.

ID Number    PERS011.1, .2 and .3

Title                Identity Discs: Lance Corporal Leslie Thomas McIntyre, 59 and 60 Battalions, AIF

Maker             Unknown

Object Type  
Personal Equipment

Place made     Unknown

Date made      c 1916

Physical          Aluminium
Description

Description
Three round aluminium identity discs, each with a hole punched out at the top for a neck thong. The reverse of discs .1 and .2 have the Australian coat of arms embossed on them.  The obverse of disc .1 is engraved ‘1693 L.T McIntyre 59th Batt A.I.F. M’. Disc .2 is similarly engraved, however, the number 59 has been voided and ‘60’ has been stamped over and next to it. The obverse of disc .1 is engraved ‘From Les to Grace 1916’. Disc .3 is stamped ‘1693 L T MC INTYRE 60 AIF METH’.

Summary
Leslie Thomas McIntyre was a 25 year old married potter from Brunswick, Victoria when he enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) on 23 February 1916. 1693 Private McIntyre embarked for overseas on board HMAT A17 Port Lincoln on 4 May 1916 with the 2 Reinforcement of the 59 Battalion.

He was taken on strength of the 5 Division Details at Tel el Kebir, Egypt on 9 July 1916. On 2 August embarked at Alexandria, Egypt and subsequently disembarked on 8 August at Marseilles, France. McIntyre marched into the 15 Training Battalion, Lark Hill, England on 21 August 1916. After a period of training there, he proceeded overseas to France on 11 November. The next day he marched into 5 Australian Division Base Details, Etaples, France. On 2 December 1916 Private McIntyre was taken on strength of the 60 Battalion.

After spending an entire year with his battalion he was sent to hospital sick between 1 and 12 December 1917. After rejoining his unit McIntyre was again sent to hospital sick on 26 December. On 20 January 1918 he embarked for England and was admitted to 1 Western Hospital, Liverpool with pneumonia.

On 24 May 1918 Private McIntyre began a course of instruction at the 5 Division Signal School (14 Training Battalion). On 22 August he proceeded overseas to France and arrived at the 5 Australian Division Base Details, Etaples, on 23 August. He rejoined the 60 Battalion on 27 August. McIntyre was appointed Lance Corporal on 16 September 1918. Nine days later, as part of the restructuring of the AIF, he was transferred to the 59 Battalion.

Lance Corporal McIntyre returned to Australia on 10 June 1919 and disembarked at 3 Military District on 5 August 1919. He was discharged on 19 September 1919.

The campaigns that Lance Corporal McIntyre took part in include: 

Second Battle of Bullecourt: 03 May 1917 - 17 May 1917

Ypres 1917: 31 July 1917 - 10 November 1917

Menin Road: 20 September 1917 - 25 September 1917

Polygon Wood: 26 September 1917 - 03 October 1917

Poelcappelle: 09 October 1917 - 09 October 1917

Passchendaele: 12 October 1917 - 12 October 1917

Mont St Quentin: 31 August 1918 - 03 September 1918

Hindenburg Line: 12 September 1918 - 09 October 1918 


















Tuesday, 6 March 2012

Colour Patch Sweetheart Brooch: 11 Battalion AIF

ID Number    PERS010

Title                Colour Patch Sweetheart Brooch: 11 Battalion AIF

Maker             Unknown

Object Type  
Badge

Place made     Unknown

Date made      c 1914-1919

Physical          Brass; Enamel
Description

Description
Rectangular sweetheart brooch depicting a 11 Battalion colour patch of brown over blue. A fastening pin and hook is attached to the back.

Summary
This badge is an example of commercially produced 'sweetheart' jewellery from the First World War. Often worn by female relatives and/or a girlfriend or wife, these brooches were a symbol of pride, support and affection for a loved one serving in the AIF. They could be purchased by the women themselves or given as a gift by the serviceman concerned. The history of this particular sweetheart brooch is not known.




Sunday, 4 March 2012

Rising Sun Collar Badge: Sand Cast

ID Number    PERS009

Title                Rising Sun Collar Badge

Maker             Unknown

Object Type  
Badge

Place made     North Africa: Egypt

Date made      c 1915

Physical          Bronze
Description

Description

Sand cast bronze AIF Rising Sun collar badge with a pair of lug fittings on the reverse. The badge appears to have been cast from an original AIF badge, and was probably made in Egypt as a replacement to a lost or missing collar or peaked cap badge.


Thursday, 1 March 2012

Improvised Identity Disc: Trooper Archibald Ross, 9 Light Horse Regiment, AIF


ID Number    PERS008

Title                Improvised Identity Disc: Trooper Archibald Ross, 9 Light Horse Regiment, AIF

Maker             Unknown

Object Type  
Personal Equipment

Place made     Unknown

Date made      c 1918-1919

Physical          Copper
Description

Description
An Australian First World War improvised identity disc made from a halfpenny. A small hole has been drilled through the top of the coin and a brass ring has been attached for it to be worn as an identity disc around the neck of the wearer. The reverse of the disk has been ground down and is engraved ‘No. 2319 A. ROSS 9th A.L.H. REGT P EGYPT 1916-17 PALESTINE 1918-19’. The obverse has the profile image of King George V’s head.

Summary
Archibald Ross was a 24 year old farmer from Golden Grove, South Australia when he enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) on 18 January 1916. 2319 Trooper Ross embarked for overseas on board HMAT A41 Bakara on 28 April 1916 with the 16 Reinforcement of the 9 Light Horse Regiment.

On 1 June 1916 Ross was taken on strength of the 3 Light Horse Training Regiment, Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt. He was subsequently taken on strength of the Headquarters ANZAC Mounted Division on 10 July 1916. On 20 August Trooper Ross was admitted to 31 General Hospital, suffering from diphtheria (mild), returning to duty on 24 September 1916. Ross was appointed Driver on 3 August 1917.

On 14 July 1919 Driver Ross embarked at Alexandria for the UK under the 10 Percent leave scheme. The leave lasted from 1 August to 2 September 1919. On 25 September he embarked at Devonport for return to Australia and disembarked at Melbourne on 13 November 1919. On 4 December 1919 he was discharged in 4 Military District (SA).


Wednesday, 29 February 2012

Returned From Active Service Badge: Private Arthur Edward Heywood, 39 Battalion, AIF


ID Number    PERS007

Title                Returned From Active Service Badge: Private Arthur Edward Heywood, 39 Battalion, AIF

Maker             Stokes and Sons

Object Type  
Badge

Place made     Australia: Victoria, Melbourne

Date made      c 1918-1919

Physical          Brass
Description

Description
A circular brass badge surmounted by a King's Crown. Around the outside of the badge in raised lettering is 'ISSUED BY DEPT. OF DEFENCE RETURNED FROM ACTIVE SERVICE'. In the center of the badge is the rising sun under which is 'A.I.F.' in raised letters. On the reverse of the badge are two brass lugs, both of which have been twisted to accommodate a fastening pin placed horizontally. Beneath the lugs is impressed the badge number '219247'. Stamped under the badge number are the maker's details 'STOKES & SONS MELB'. Above the lugs has been marked ‘A E HEYWOOD’.

Summary
Arthur Edward Heywood was a 25 year old farm labourer from Narrung, Victoria, when he enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) on 26 January 1917. Arthur had previously attempted to join the AIF; however, he was rejected on the grounds of being unfit due to having a hernia. 3172 Private Heywood embarked for overseas from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A70 Ballarat on 19 February 1917 with the 7 Reinforcements of the 39 Battalion.

He disembarked at Devonport, England on 25 April 1917 and the next day marched into 10 Training Battalion, Durrington. On 17 August 1917 Private Heywood was sentenced 4 days Field Punishment Number 2 with a forfeiture of 28 days pay, for conduct to the prejudice of good order and discipline in that he neglected to put on his web equipment when he was ordered to do so. Heywood proceeded overseas to France via Southampton 20 August 1917 and the next day he marched into 3 Australian Division Base Details, Rouelles, France. He was there until 29 August 1917. Private Heywood was taken on strength of the 39 Battalion on 1 September 1917.

On 12 March 1918 Private Heywood was accidentally wounded, suffering serve phosphorous burns to face, hands, neck and left arm.  He was admitted to both the 10 Field Ambulance and also the New Zealand Stationary Hospital, Wisques on the day of the wounding. On 31 March 1918 he was sent to 2 Australian General Hospital, Boulogne. Heywood was invalided to the UK and admitted to the Fulham Military Hospital, Hammersmith, London, on 8 April 1918. On 24 April 1918 he was admitted to 1 Australian Auxiliary Hospital, Harefield. He was granted furlough from 30 May to 13 June 1918.  At the conclusion of his furlough Heywood reported to 2 Command Depot, Weymouth. He returned to Australia 6 August 1918 due to his injuries, disembarking in Melbourne on 28 September 1918. Private Heywood was discharged 18 September 1919. Arthur Heywood died on 15 July 1945.

Private Heywood took part in the battles of Broodseinde on 4 October, and Passchendaele on 12 October 1917.